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Rate of Women Behind-the-Scenes in Film Declines to 1998 Levels
According to a new study released by the Women's Media Center on March 22nd, 2017, the number of women in behind- the- scenes roles has decreased significantly, matching the levels of female involvement in 1998. The Status of Women in the U.S. Media 2017 states that in the 250 top-grossing domestic films of 2015-16, only 17% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors and cinematographers combined were female. That rate was 2 percentage points lower than that of 2014-15 and equal to 1998.

The study concluded that, of those 250 films 96% had no women cinematographers, 92% had no women directors, 79% had no women editors, 77% had no women writers, 58% had no women executive producers and 34% had no women producers.

These women were hired behind the scenes on those 250 films: 24% of producers on those projects were female,17% of executive producers were female, 17% of film editors were female,13% of writers were female, 5% of cinematographers were female and 3% of composers were female.

However, the films with at least one female director 64% of writers were women; while 9% of writers on projects exclusively directed by men were female. 43% of editors were female; but 17% of cinematographers on projects with only male directors were female. 16% of cinematographers were female, while 6% on projects with only male directors were female. 6% of composers were female, while 3% on projects with only male directors were female.

The study also takes an in-depth look at related fields including TV network news; traditional print and online-only journalism; sports journalism; radio, television and multi-platform journalism; tech, social media and gaming; and more. Importantly, the WMC also offers a roadmap with guidance for media leaders looking to cultivate parity.

Men still dominate media across all platforms—television, newspapers, online and wires—with change coming only incrementally. Women are not equal partners in telling the story, nor are they equal partners in sourcing and interpreting what and who is important in the story.

Read the full study.

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NYWIFT programs, screenings and events are supported, in part, by grants from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and New York State Council on the Arts